Water on the Moon and Mars

Media reports relating to water issues in general.
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Grahame
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Water on the Moon and Mars

Post by Grahame » Mon Sep 28, 2009 2:00 pm

Anyone who has dowsed for this and had a positive response will be pleased to know that the existence of water has been confirmed on both the Moon and Mars, according to Universe Today:
Universe Today wrote:The Moon has been turned upside down. Figuratively, of course. La Luna still orbits and phases as it always has, but we are now looking at the moon anew. From this day forward we know the chemistry of the Moon is different than what we have thought for decades, the geology might vary from what is in textbooks today, and the physics of how the solar wind interacts with a rocky body without an atmosphere has implications not yet fully investigated. So, what does this mean for our future human and robotic exploration of our closest companion in space?

"The Moon continues to surprise us," said Carle Pieters, principal investigator for the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M cubed) at Thursdays press conference. "Widespread water has been detected on the surface of the Moon. You have to think outside of the box on this. This is not what any of us expected decades ago.
Taken from HERE
And as if that wasn't exciting enough for you:
Universe Today wrote:Images of recent impact craters taken by the HiRISE Camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have revealed sub-surface water ice halfway between the north pole and the equator on Mars. While the Phoenix lander imaged subsurface ice where the top layer of soil had been disturbed at the landing site near the north pole, these new images – taken in quick succession, detecting how the ice sublimated away — are the first to show evidence of water ice at much lower latitudes. Surprisingly, the white ice may be made from 99 percent pure water.
Taken from HERE
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The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.

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Re: Water on the Moon and Mars

Post by Ian Pegler » Sat Oct 17, 2009 4:58 pm

Here's an interesting quote:
"Crashing a two-ton space probe into a celestial body is a unique way to look for water. Fairly expensive too. I guess nobody at NASA has ever heard of a divining rod." - Carleton Bryant (link broken-GG), Assistant Managing Editor, the Washington Times
Well quite. As a matter of interest, the presence of water/ice on the Moon was suggested in Herge's Adventures of Tintin. As we have shown, Herge had an interest in dowsing.
Tintin wrote:"Great Snakes! Ice!"
CLICK HERE for the Dowsing in Herge's Adventures of Tintin thread.

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Re: Water on the Moon and Mars

Post by Grahame » Wed Oct 20, 2010 8:37 am

Underground Acquifers Fed Long-Lived Oceans, Lakes on Ancient Mars
Images from the spacecraft orbiting Mars seem to indicate the Red Planet may once have had oceans and lakes, and researchers are still trying to figure out how these bodies of water could have developed. A new explanation is that underground aquifers fed water to the surface, forming the floors of ancient continental-scale basins on Mars. The groundwater emerged through extensive and widespread fractures, leading to the formation of river systems, large-scale regional erosion, sedimentary deposition and water ponding in widespread and long-lasting bodies of water in Mars northern plains.

J. Alexis Palmero Rodriguez, research scientist at the Planetary Science Institute PSI, has been studying the Martian northern lowlands region, finding extensive sedimentary deposits that resemble the abyssal plains of Earth’s ocean floors. It is also like the floors of other basins on Mars where oceans are thought to have developed.

The origin of these deposits and the formation of Martian lakes and seas has been a controversial subject over the years. One theory is that there was a sudden release of large volumes of water and sediment from zones of apparent crustal collapse known as “chaotic terrains.” However, these zones of collapse are on the whole rare on Mars, while the plains deposits are widespread and common within large basin settings, Rodriguez said.

From evidence in the planet’s northern plains (south of Gemini Scopuli in Planum Boreum), Rodriguez’ new model does not require sudden massive groundwater discharges. Instead, it advocates for groundwater discharges being widespread, long-lived and common in the northern plains of Mars.
Read more at Universe Today.
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The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.

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Re: Water on the Moon and Mars

Post by Grahame » Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:21 pm

There are some fantastic pictures here of the ice-filled Korolev Crater on Mars, taken from the Mars Express orbiter:

https://earthsky.org/space/mars-express ... er-on-mars
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The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.

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Re: Water on the Moon and Mars

Post by mike » Tue Aug 20, 2019 8:17 pm

Really interesting Grahame, if you dowse the HRSC ORBIT blue picture at 75 degree N is a Ley Line running east to west there across Mars, small world right.The pictures show the influence of a Ley line at the top of each picture, but the Orbit map gives more detail and shows more ground on Mars.

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