Yarrow

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Grahame
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Post by Grahame »

ocd wrote: I moved house over 2 years ago and I chose where to put my bed in the new house and where to sit in my lounge. Both these places are on a water vein, I found out when I started dowsing at a later date.
That's interesting that you chose to site your bed and chair on water lines. Most earth energy dowsers would consider this to be a bad idea as geopathic stress is associated with water lines.
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Post by ocd »

Hi Grahame

I have to agree with you, I didn't sleep very well for a long time and I have been working on clearing the stress.

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Post by ocd »

The Yarrow is in full flower here in sunny cornwall and I've still yet to find a single stem of it growing off of a serpentine line.
I have been to lots of sites dowsing in the sunshine and wherever there has been Yarrow I've looked and found a serpent.
The yarrow seems to like the coast paths and at first looks like it is just dotted around, but this doesn't seem to be the case.
I have an inkling that it may prefer the more passive yin serpents.

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Re: Yarrow

Post by Helen-Healing »

Quite by accident, I came across an area in Scotland, near Selkirk, where the word Yarrow abounds. See map here. The river that runs through it is even called Yarrow Water & there are standing stones a-gogo. Here's a bit about the standing stones. Twould be interesting to know if yarrow plant grows abundantly here!
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Grahame »

Hi Helen;
I haven't visited Yarrow, but I think I might have to make a little trip down there for a look around.
After doing a bit of Googling to try and find the etymology of the name, the best I came up with was this Overview of Yarrow page:
Well known for its battles, feuds and beauty, the Yarrow Valley spurred the creation of numerous ballads, such as 'The Dowie Dens of Yarrow', and figured highly in Sir Walter Scott's collection of Minstrelsy. Other authors associated with the area include William Dunbar, James Hogg, Christopher North and Wordsworth.
And then there's this page about the Yarrow Stone. This doesn't seem to be the same one as your link, which would appear to be just a Yarrow stone.... 8)

I still haven't pinned down the name other than that it used to be called St. Mary's and was renamed Yarrow when the parish was moved next to the eponymous river around the middle of the 17th century (from here). But this area saw a lot of Norse influence and many of the river names in the Borders are from Norse. I'm no expert, but it seems more likely to me that the name comes from the Norse Jarrow - as in the Newcastle one. But then presumably the plant comes from the same root (sorry - couldn't resist the pun!)?

Having said that, I also discovered that one of the uses of Yarrow is that it can be used in beer-making. Traquair House, not too far up the road, has been brewing its own beer since the 18th century (and very fine it is too!). A possible connection there, perhaps?

Ooh - and I've just found this interesting titbit in Alistair Moffat's 'Before Scotland':
...the Yarrow valley can be a windy, lonely place... One of Britain's most intriguing post-Roman inscribed stones stands at Whitehope Farm. It appears to commemorate a battle and the death of two native prices some time in the 6th Century. They were Nudus and Dumnogenus, perhaps remnants of the Selgovan aristocracy. All around them are the echoes of an ancient burial ground. Near the farm lies the 'Dead Pool' and the tradition of a mass grave of slain warriors. Two other nearby standing stones align with the memorial stone (itself probably a standing stone before the letters were chiselled on it) and the strange name Annan Street is adjacent, for a patch of boggy ground to the north. The historian Walter Elliot has come across the possibility of several large and very early cemeteries at Whitehope, all dug on the same platform of high ground as the standing stone sits on. Perhaps it was a burial place for the Selgovan Kings.
Looks like some interesting dowsing possibilities... Yes, I think I can feel a little day trip coming on!
Grahame
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Helen-Healing »

Blimey - Selgovans!! That's a new one to me! :shock: Must do a little research...and not having much luck, I must say. Most of the google links seem to be quotations from old books, or I need a subscription to read it. :roll: Onwards & upwards...
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Grahame »

Sorry - should have linked Selgovae (Wikipedia).
The Selgovae were a Brythonic tribe in Scotland, inhabiting roughly the central Borders area. They were neighbours of, and perhaps an offshoot of, the Votadini to the east. Their capital was on North Eildon hill near Melrose, near where the Romans later built the fort of Trimontium, Newstead.

The territory of the Selgovae appears to have formed part of the kingdom of Gododdin in post-Roman times.
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The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Grahame »

I've been doing a bit more digging through my library about Yarrow, and have uncovered some interesting bits and bobs. This first from 'The Silver Bough - Scottish Folklore & Belief vol. 1':
St. Mary's Loch in Yarrow was the haunt of a water-cow of which the Ettrick Shepherd writes - "A farmer in the neighbourhood got a breed of her that multiplied and throve well until the farmer somehow outraged or offended her; whereupon one fine night the old dam came out of the loch and gave such a roar that the surrounding hills shook again; upon which her progeny, nineteen in number, followed her quietly into the water and were never seen again"
The water-cow appears in few Scottish folk tales, but it appears to be a more pastoral relative of the kelpie, or water-horse. The reference to the nineteen offspring is interesting, and may show some reference to the lunar cycle. The Borders had a strong Druidic presence, and Yarrow was 'the Druidic Plant of Power', according to the same book, and had to be harvested in a special way:
I will pull the yarrow/ As Mary pulled it with her two hands;/ I will pull it with my strength/ I will pull it with the hollow of my hand.
More importantly for our current inquiry, Yarrow is also called bloodwort, soldiers' woundwort and knights' milfoil, and is noted for it's wound-healing powers. Perhaps not surprising that it is found in this instance growing in profusion on the site of an old battlefield? It may be that the ground conditions following a battle favour the growth of Yarrow, and so it became associated with blood and wound-healing following the Law of Sympathy, as so many herbal remedies do.
It would be interesting to know if there is a dowsing connection between old battlefields and serpentine energy lines...

Another couple of 'factoids', this time from 'Man, Myth & Magic' (remember that?):
Yarrow, gathered from a young man's grave and laid under the pillow on Midsummer's Eve, produced the shade of one's husband-to-be...
Yarrow is a splendidly ambivalent plant, originally regarded as dedicated to the Devil, but with due care admirable for divination and keeping away evil, as well as having genuine herbal qualities.
Grahame
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Satyr »

On the other hand of this, yarrow isn't indigenous where I live and I have been wanting to grow some. Would it then be beneficial to the plant to acertain if there are any serpentine lines in my garden and then grow it on one. If so, how do I go about finding if there are serpentine lines in my garden and would it be beneficial or detrimental to me and my family to have one in our garden (serpentine line, not yarrow).
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Helen-Healing »

I have been looking at yarrow in my 'sacred herb bible' :mrgreen: which is a book called 'The Renewed Dioscorides' printed in Spanish by Dr Pio Font Quer in the first half of the last century.. I've had this book for almost 30 years, and it's an 'update' on Dioscorides' work De Materia Medica written in the 1stC AD. It's a tome almost 4" thick with 1033 pages! Ahem.

In Spanish, Yarrow is called milenrama - a reference to the many small leaves on each leaf bract. An anecdote to its being called woundwort:

"In France, this herb is often called herbe a charpentier, or herbe de Saint-Joseph. The story goes that once Joseph, being a carpenter, hurt himself badly and the child Jesus went to look for a herb to cure the wound. He returned with yarrow."

All the other references confirm the use of yarrow as a herb not only to staunch the flow of blood & cure wounds, but also for menstrual irregularities & haemorroids! :P The flowering tops of the plant are used.
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Kevin »

OCD,
Hello flower,
I am from yorkshire where that is an oft used greeting.
We are going to Chelsea flower show tomorrow, I will see if there is anyone that really knows about the yarrow .
How is the dowsing progressing?
I have been well occupied through the winter looking into the future with quantum understandings, I find that a total electrical universe way of looking at things fits tightly with dowsing, and they are listening to me about it.
The difficult part is finding the words to describe that fit into these mainly maths and physics peoples dictionary of understandings.
I now consider the lines as carrier lines that permeate all.
That which flows upon the lines which you think of as serpent flows, is STUFF oft called plasma, but there is a dual aspect to this STUFF, the earth symbiotically acts upon the incoming flows of negative spin charge and turn them into positive spin charge ( don't worry about the words negative and positive , it merely describes spin state ) the negative is super attracted to the positive, this leads to creation at the surface area of the globe.
The stuff flowing along the lines is always attracted to vector points of concentrated positive, and spirals from line to line always leading into that point.
This is where your clever Yarrow seed germinates, possibly the ones lucky enough to fall close are the ones that do germinate?
At this point, the STUFF concentrates and coalesces into matter.
I consider that the STUFF is alive and contains information.
Therefore such as this plant will KNOW and contain vast amounts of information relevent to life, hence its use and myth like history.
The universe is full of magical things, waiting for our wits to grow sharper, Eden Phillpots.
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Re: Yarrow

Post by Hillary »

A woman came to my home for the first time today to clean whom I never met before. She is
from Hungary. I was very interested in the posts regarding the Yarrow plant. I asked the
woman if she went to college in Hungary and what she studied. Her reply was horticulture.
I mentioned my interest in the Yarrow plant and showed her a photo of it. She said
that they can be found everywhere in Hungary. I explained that it is a very Spiritual
plant. She connected with this and said that Hungary is the heart of the World and
when the Dali Lama came to visit he kissed the ground.
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Re: Yarrow

Post by ocd »

hi kevin
hope you have a good time at chelsea flower show. Some native plant species can be notoriously difficult to grow as far as I know? ( I'm not an expert ). I'd be interested in what you find out about the humble yarrow.
I'm not dowsing as much at the moment, I seem to be working all the time and I've moved house and am no longer sleeping over a water vein, and living with geopathic stress anymore.
I'd like to do some more dowsing of yarrow in the summer and check out it's energy field and hertz frequency.
Epicormic growth, canker and burls on trees are other areas I'd like to investigate more thoroughly as well, they seem to have possible connections with serpentine lines too.

ocd
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