Charged stones

Discussions relating to earth energy dowsing in general.
Post Reply
royaberarth
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:10 pm
Location: West Wales

Charged stones

Post by royaberarth »

Does anyone know if Jack Fidler's work with germinating cress seedlings was ever followed up. Reported in "Ley Lines" by J Havelock Fidler 1983.
Ian Pegler
Expert
Expert
Posts: 2823
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 12:04 pm
Location: Borth, Mid Wales

germinating cress

Post by Ian Pegler »

Hi Roy

A new book called "Seed of Knowledge, Stone of Plenty" by John Burke and Kaj Halberg seems to contradict Fidler's findings somewhat - sort of.

They discovered that storing maize seeds for a length of time at certain ancient sacred sites actually increases yield by as much as 300% but if stored too long it can have a detrimental effect.

All this is described in a very extensive book review to be published in the forthcoming December edition of Dowsing Today. The review is written by Sue Brown, who raved about it when she was giving her acceptance speech (she won an award at the recent BSD conference, as you know).

I'm reading Burke and Halberg right now. As far as the effect of earth energies on seed germination is concerned, I would forget about Fidler, that stuff's old and the new work is much more extensive and thorough.

This is a very important book for dowsers. You can buy it from the BSD.

Ian
User avatar
Grahame
Site Admin
Site Admin
Proficient
Proficient
Posts: 1379
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2004 5:52 pm
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

Post by Grahame »

I've just finished reading the book, and there is some great stuff in it, although I felt they might have been stretching their theory a bit far by trying to include practically every ancient monument from the S. American temples to the pyramids.
There are also a few glaring howlers in there, such as wrongly attributing an Arthur C. Clarke quote to Isaac Asimov (OK, that's pretty minor I admit); or declaring that Avebury is too perfectly circular to have been laid out with ropes.....! I mean, what?! <sound of jaw hitting floor>:shock: :shock:
Even a cursory examination of a survey plan of Avebury instantly shows that it is a compound ring, not a circle.
If those are indicative of the thoroughness of their research, it does cast a bit of a shadow over the veracity of the rest of their results.
There's also a bit too much reliance on interpreting 'orb' photographs as evidence of heightened energy fields for my taste.

But still definitely worth reading - this is important research material.
Grahame
The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it - Terry Pratchett.
User avatar
Geoff Stuttaford
Silver Supporter
Silver Supporter
Competent
Competent
Posts: 893
Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 12:56 pm
Location: Weston-super-Mare

Re: germinating cress

Post by Geoff Stuttaford »

Ian Pegler wrote:Hi Roy

A new book called "Seed of Knowledge, Stone of Plenty" by John Burke and Kaj Halberg seems to contradict Fidler's findings somewhat - sort of.

They discovered that storing maize seeds for a length of time at certain ancient sacred sites actually increases yield by as much as 300% but if stored too long it can have a detrimental effect.

All this is described in a very extensive book review to be published in the forthcoming December edition of Dowsing Today. The review is written by Sue Brown, who raved about it when she was giving her acceptance speech (she won an award at the recent BSD conference, as you know).

I'm reading Burke and Halberg right now. As far as the effect of earth energies on seed germination is concerned, I would forget about Fidler, that stuff's old and the new work is much more extensive and thorough.

Ian

Hi Ian,

This is an extract from Derek Cameron's article on 'The Roots of Findhorn'

"Peter Caddy also brought to his life at Findhorn a deep belief in the possibility of guidance, a belief that dated from a childhood encounter with a medium that he credited for a win in a school boxing match. He had started a small vegetable garden to alleviate the problem of feeding a family of five on unemployment benefit. When he ran into questions about gardening that books could not answer, it was to the possibility of guidance that he turn. Specifically, he asked Dorothy Maclean if she would attempt to turn her sensitivity to this goal.

It is not clear from the published accounts whether Dorothy Maclean had already read at that time theosophist Geoffrey Hodson's 1952 Kingdom of the Gods. That book describes the results of Hodson's clairvoyant investigations of the deva forces, and introduces terms as such as "landscape angel" that would later become part of the Findhorn vocabulary.

Whatever the case, Maclean was sensitive enough to establish her own contact with the devas of the plant kingdom, and peform her own experiments. Under this devic guidance the garden at Findhorn flourished. Local people began to visit, and this led to an invitation for Caddy to appear on a 1965 BBC radio program on gardening. This was the first that the world outside of Morayshire learned of the giant vegetables miraculousy appearing at Findhorn. There was no public mention of the deva contacts at this time, though; the public would not learn of these contacts until several years later."

I wonder if you consider that there is a link between what was done at Findhorn and what Burke and Halberg write about in relation to bigger crops than normal. Do you think that there is any link between the activities of the human mind, or the knowledge that there may be help from other sources - whatever - (besides those of earth fertility) that will encourage seeds/crops to achieve much higher productibity than normal ?

Geoff
Ian Pegler
Expert
Expert
Posts: 2823
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 12:04 pm
Location: Borth, Mid Wales

it's definitely mainstream

Post by Ian Pegler »

Geoff wrote:I wonder if you consider that there is a link between what was done at Findhorn and what Burke and Halberg write about in relation to bigger crops than normal
Burke and Halberg are mainstream scientists who have their own theories about why storing maize seeds at certain sacred sites increases yield. Those theories are well within the bounds of mainstream science and nothing whatsoever to do with the realms of spirit, parapsychology or whatever.

It's not a "New Age" book or a dowsing book at all. However, they need to establish that the people who built these monuments could detect the energies that they hold responsible for the effect. This is why dowsing is mentioned. However, the energies held responsible for the effect are also mainstream stuff like telluric fields and "electron showers", all detectable using various standard electronic equipment - magnetometers etc. etc.

Ian

(mod - double post deleted. Tut, tut, Ian! :) - GG)
User avatar
Geoff Stuttaford
Silver Supporter
Silver Supporter
Competent
Competent
Posts: 893
Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 12:56 pm
Location: Weston-super-Mare

Re: it's definitely mainstream

Post by Geoff Stuttaford »

(mod - extraneous quote deleted -GG)

Thanks for that, Ian. It would appear that this could be another example of scientists trying to explain the unexplainable using different words.

Geoff
simonwheeler
Copper Supporter
Copper Supporter
Proficient
Proficient
Posts: 1001
Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2004 7:22 pm
Location: Wigtown, Scotland
Contact:

Post by simonwheeler »

http://www.forteantimes.com/features/ar ... dhorn.html (link broken)
for an article about Findhorn Foundation origins. I live close to, and know people from, "the Community"...which for those who don't know is right next door to RAF Kinloss- how ironic is that!...and must point out that Findhorn Bay and Findhorn Village are separate from the Foundation.
Don’t be so open-minded that your brains fall out. LAWRENCE FERLINGHETTI

www.simongordonwheeler.co.uk

Simon
royaberarth
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:10 pm
Location: West Wales

Jack Fidler's charged stones

Post by royaberarth »

A bit like chinese whispers isn't it - from cress seedlings via maize to Findhorn's giant cabbages!

I ran a small trial like Jack Fidler's some twenty odd years ago but the day job got in the way and I was never able to repeat it.

So does any one know if any one else tried to repeat the experiment?
Ian Pegler
Expert
Expert
Posts: 2823
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 12:04 pm
Location: Borth, Mid Wales

Chinese whispers

Post by Ian Pegler »

royaberarth wrote:A bit like chinese whispers isn't it
Yes.

Ian
Post Reply